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The Maori Volcanics - Blues By 5

2011: Māori Volcanics live at the 2011 Waiata Māori Awards.

Guitar - Billy Peters
Bass - Monty Cowan
Keys - Renata Kahuroa
Drums - Kristian Paul
Sax1 - Joe Haami
Sax2 - Selwyn Rawiri
Sax3 - Marsh Cook



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Video courtesy of www.nzonscreen.com

Billy T James - Special

1990: In April 1990, Billy Taitoko James came back from years of ill health, and made a triumphant return to performing his unique brand of music and comedy. It was a last hurrah for James, whose transplanted heart gave out on him the following year, but it's a worthy swansong. His unique brand of humour is captured here at its affable, non-PC, best, with Billy T giving everything he's got - every gag is rounded off with his trademark 'bro' laugh - for a loudly appreciative audience. Guests include Sir Howard Morrison.

Dame Kiri Te Kanawa - Pōkarekare Ana

1999: New Zealand traditional song, Pōkarekare Ana. Soprano: Kiri Te Kanawa. Wellington Concert, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. Conducted by John Hophins.

Che Fu ft. Teremoana Rapley

1998: Video for Che Fu's single "Waka", from his 1998 album "2b S.Pacific"

Toni Huata - Ko Wai Ka Hua

2000: Waiata composed by Te Okanga Kahutapere Huata and performed by Toni Huata. Directed by: Sima Urale.

Video courtesy of www.nzonscreen.com

Howard Morrison Special - Hamilton

1982: This is Howard Morrison in his prime, wearing a white suit and a big smile. It’s a cabaret performance with all of Morrison’s hallmarks – big musical anthems, a few laughs and a lacing of Māori culture. His award of OBE provides an opportunity for a self-deprecating gag – Ordinary Brown Entertainer – but this show proves he is anything but. A master of ad lib, Morrison has a packed house hanging on his every word and note. He belts out a string of favourites, from ‘Begin the Beguine’ and ‘Mori the Hori’ to his hit single ‘Whakaaria Mai’.
 
This is Howard Morrison in his prime, wearing a white suit and a big smile. It’s a cabaret performance with all of Morrison’s hallmarks – big musical anthems, a few laughs and a lacing of Māori culture. His recent award of OBE provides an opportunity for a self-deprecating gag – Ordinary Brown Entertainer – but this show proves he is anything but. A master of ad lib, Morrison has a packed house hanging on his every word and note. He belts out a string of favourites, from ‘Begin the Beguine’ and ‘Mori the Hori’ to his hit single ‘Whakaaria Mai’.

 

The Yandall Sisters - Sweet Inspiration

1986: The Yandall Sisters' Sweet Inspiration was an absolute smash and bona-fide Kiwi classic - here (live in 1986) they reprise their most successful single in front of a live television audience, showcasing yet again the soul and those magical harmonies which took them to the very top of the NZ charts, thus launching a lasting international career. Inspirational indeed - viva los Yandalls!! NZ music at its soulful finest.

Video courtesy of www.nzonscreen.com

The Holidaymakers - Sweet Lovers

1988: The first single for Wellington band The Holidaymakers was a cover of a little known song by Bill Withers. It spent six weeks at number one and was the biggest selling single in NZ in 1988. With no budget at all, director Fane Flaws created a beautifully lit video that captures the song’s infectious brightness and warmth. With a collection of lamps the only concession to props or special effects, nothing detracts from the compelling performances by vocalists Peter Marshall and Mara Finau. Sweet Lovers won Best Video at the NZ Music Awards in 1988.

Upper Hutt Posse - Ragga Girl

1994: Upon the release of the movie Once Were Warriors, the group's single "Ragga Girl".

Teremoana Rapley - Four Women

1995: The second solo release Four Women is originally a Nina Simone song. Initially given an 'A' Rotate listing on commercial radio stations throughout Aotearoa until, the networks listened to the lyrics and took it completely off air. Thank goodness a dope ass music video was created which gave it longer television air play.

Music Video: Directed by Ross Cunningham, Edited by Gregor Boyd (I think...) Conceptual Design: Teremoana, George Nuku and Ross Cunningham. Make-up: Lisa. Stylist: Tracey Tawhiao and Teremoana. Production Runner: Paolo Rotundo. Players: Steve Harrop (upright bass), Steve (Grand Piano and Strings) and Miguel Fuentes (percussion). Recorded at York Street Studios, Auckland. Released around 1995 with permission.

Che Fu ft. DLT - Chains

1996: Amidst a tale of despair in the city a staunch 'no nukes' message is delivered with aplomb by Che Fu in this performance-based promo for the DLT song: "Come test me like a bomb straight from Murda-roa / How comes I got cyclops fish in my water / A Nation of Pacific lambs to the slaughter / Three eyes for my son and an extra foot for my daughter". Helmed by acclaimed music video director Kerry Brown, bold urban-Pacific imagery augments the chart-topping track with the deceptively catchy chorus: "Living in the city ain't so bad ..."

Prince Tui Teka - Before The Next Tear Drops Fall

1978: Live in Tolaga Bay.

Annie Crummer ft. Herbs - See What Love Can Do

1992: From her debut solo album 'Language', featuring the band Herbs.

Dam Native ft. Che Fu - The Son

1997: Chefu teams up with Dam Native and they all look good in sharp menswear. The song combines Dam Native’s beats and rhymes with Che’s smooth vocals, and the video directed by Steve Morrison picks up on this.But there’s another aspect to the video – it’s proudly Maori. Che and the longer-haired Dam Native guys have their haired pulled back in a traditional topknot, adorned with feathers.

Herbs - Nuclear Waste

1985: Promo video for Herb's 'Nuclear Waste', from 1985's Long Ago Album

Herbs ft. Dave Dobbyn - Slice of Heaven

1986: Slice of Heaven hit no.1 on the NZ music charts on 2 October 1986 and stayed there for 8 weeks. The song became synonymous with the film and remained on the charts for over six weeks, going Gold within five weeks and was named Song of the Year at the 1986 New Zealand Music Awards.

Trinity Roots - Little Things

1991: This (mostly) black and white video by director Chris Graham stars the late Wi Kuki Kaa. The concept is simple but impactful: a close up on Kaa's eye slowly zooming in and out of memories. In combination with Kaa's mesmerising performance — seated on a veranda as family activities take place around him — it works superbly to convey the essence of the song. Look out for a cameo from Julian Arahanga in the moving celebration of whānau and community.

Video courtesy of www.nzonscreen.com

Moana and the Moahunters - AEIOU

1991: This was the first music video funded by New Zealand on Air. The song is a plea for Māori youth to preserve their culture by learning the reo (and it also doubles as a handy guide to Māori pronunciation). Director Kerry Brown created vibrant animated backgrounds to match the song’s hip-hop beats — and included cameo appearances from Moana Maniapoto’s father; Mika; MC OJ and the Rhythm Slave; and various crew members. The Moahunters were Mina Ripia (who went on to her own act Wai) and Teremoana Rapley (from Upper Hutt Posse; who now manages King Kapisi).

Cats Away - Melting Pot

1988: Chart-topping single for all female vocal group When the Cat's Away in November 1988. The self produced video is heavy on 80s fluoro colours and overexposed whites while the placement of the Cats around a single mic affords them plenty of chances to interact and enjoy each other's company. The self produced video is heavy on 80s fluoro colours and overexposed whites while the placement of the Cats around a single mic affords them plenty of chances to interact and enjoy each other's company.

Herbs - Sensitive to a smile

1987: Herbs visited sometimes-troubled town Ruatoria in 1987 bringing music and aroha, and leaving with a mini-documentary and this evocative music video. A beautiful video for a beautiful song (about beautiful people). Lee Tamahori, of Once Were Warriors fame, was co-director, and the clip won Best Music Video at the 1987 New Zealand Music Awards.

Iwi - Mō Ake

1999: Iwi won a New Zealand Music Award for their first self titled album "Iwi".

The Quin Tiki's - Guitar Boogie Shuffle

1966: From the Kiwi feature film 'Don't Let It Get You'. Rim De Paul & Eddie Low went on to successful solo careers from this group.

Eddie Low - I Can't Stop Loving You

Showband extraordinaire, Eddie toured in many Maori showbands including the Quintikis' and went on to record albums in NZ, Australia and the States.

John Rowles - Cheryl Moana Marie

1963: One of John Rowles most well-known songs

The Howard Morrison Quartet

1963: Footage of their live performance at the Miss World New Zealand pageant.

Hinewehi Mohi - Kotahitanga

1999: Kotahitanga is a pop song on Hinewehi Mohi's 1999 CD Oceanaia with an endlessly repetitive "Whaka-awe-awe" chorus.

Family Affair

1980:  Hauled from the video treasure trove, our Waatea Breakfast host, Dale Husband get's his groove & hair on with the whānau: Maryanne, Steve and Boof Husband on the Mike Walsh Show, Sydney.

Survival - Rua Kenana

1991: Live, Song written by David Grace about the Tūhoe prophet Rua Kenana.

Moana and The Moahunters - Black Pearl

1990: Original video featuring Dean Hapeta from Upper Hutt Posse topped the NZ Charts in 1990 with their funky version of Black Pearl.

Dean Waretini - The Bridge

1981: "Il Silencio", or "The Bridge" sung by  Dean Waretini. Written by George Tait

Kiri Te Kanawa - Tarakihi

1999:  From the album, Maori Songs, produced for the new millenium.

Tina Cross - Nothing But Dreams

1979: Live TV recording, Popular NZ Singer and entertainer Tina Cross seen here as a youngster in 1979, performing a song composed by Carl Doy on NZ Television.
 

Moana and the Moahunters - Kua Makona

1987:  Rare slice of mid-Eighties pop from Moana and produced by Dalvanius and Ryan Monga.

Herbs - Long Ago

1984:  Herbs' third release and first full album Long Ago, which featured the 1984 single of the same name.

Prince Tui Teka - Mum & E I Po

1982:  Composed by Ngoi Pewhairangi and performed by Prince Tui Teka at the Mandalay Nightclub in Newmarket, Auckland.

Ardijah - Time Makes The Wine

1987: Classic 4-piece Ardijah live in action in 1987. Ryan Monga, Tony T and Simon Lynch laying down a solid dance-floor groove while stellar 21-year old vocalist Betty Anne Monga stunning version of Time Makes The Wine.

Southside of Bombay - What's the time Mr Wolf?

1994: Originally released in 1992 and re-released in 1994 following its appearance on the movie/soundtrack 'Once Were Warriors'.

Sonny Day - Saving Up

1984: Sonny Day's "Saving Up" shot in 1984 by Big Bang Creation Co. (John McWilliam & Roger Guise). Band includes Tama Renata, Walter Bianco, Neil Edwards. BV's Annie Crummer, Beaver & Josie Rika.

Patea Maori Club - Poi E

1984: Composed by Ngoi Pewhairangi, musical score by Dalvanius Prime
   

 


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