Monday August 31, 2015   Last updated 10:30AM
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World Indigenous studies for Fulbright Scholarship winner

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The recipient of this year's Ngā Pae ō Te Maramatanga Fulbright Scholarship is going to spend some of her time working out how Māori can win Pākehā support.

Veronica Tawhai, who lectures in Māori development at Massey University, will spend three months at the Centre for World Indigenous Studies in Washington.

She says as well as looking at how indigenous people see themselves, she wants to look at the kind of education programmes that can help non-indigenous people respond better to indigenous concerns.

“Because we live in a country here in Aotearoa where pākehā are the majority. Māori do rely on them so much for Māori development, lots of Maori say ‘oh no we don’t’, but the thing is that it’s true. Every election day that we go to the polling booths is what type of government gets elected. We really rely on the understanding of this non-indigenous majority what type of government gonna be best for everyone”.

Veronica Tawhai says countries like New Zealand which underwent a period of colonisation need a new sort of citizenship education.
 
VeronicaTawhaiNga Pae o Te Maramatanga Fulbright Scholarship winner, Veronica Tawhai



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