Sunday March 25, 2018   Last updated 14:18PM

On Air Now | Radio Waatea

02:00pm - 03:00pm
Wily Willie could be election decider.

Share to Email
Share to RSS
Share to Print

Wily Willie could be election decider.
Paul Moon


It was all going so well. The Maori Party looked revitalised, and heading into election year could claim successes in its flagship Whanau Ora programme, as well as being part of a government that has concluded some of the most important Treaty settlements in a generation. And on top of that, the party has reached an entente with an equally resurgent Mana Party, which while not necessarily cordial, nonetheless represents a potentially vital voting bloc in Parliament after the September election.

At the same time, Labour looked to be struggling to secure its Maori support-base, especially after an underwhelming performance by its leader at Ratana last month.

So all the signs appeared to be pointing to a collapse in Labour’s Maori vote. Until, that is, Andrew Little’s stroke of genius in placing Willie Jackson on a high list position in the party - thus almost guaranteeing him a seat in Parliament after the election. But why does Jackson represent a potential change in fortune for Labour and as a more distant possibility, the chance of a Labour victory in seven months? The answer is twofold.

Firstly, Jackson is personally endearing and intelligent, and represents the Labour Party of old - when it was still a party of the workers rather than forlorn liberal social causes. In addition, he already has parliamentary experience, and is a communicator with a common touch - at a time when some in the Labour-Green marriage come across as aloof academic types.

However, what makes Jackson so important as far as the Maori vote is concerned is that he is the highest-profile candidate in any party who is standing explicitly for urban Maori. The accusation that the Maori party is the parliamentary branch of an iwi elite is a longstanding one. And at the same time, this so-called iwi elite is attracting growing criticism from some quarters as inequalities within many iwi show no sign of reducing, despite the increasing wealth of some tribes.

As an example, the Herald reported last week that Tainui has net assets per member of $13,901, compared with Ngapuhi’s net assets per member of $425. Yet in both cases, significant poverty plagues a large portion of both iwi. What has become abundantly clear over the last two decades is the growth in the wealth in most iwi has not been accompanied by the broad elevation in the proportionate wealth of the members of those iwi.

And this is when Jackson’s presence becomes crucial. He can potentially become the mouthpiece of what is nominally called “urban” Maori, but which in practice now encompasses those Maori who - regardless of where they live - feel they have seen little benefit from the Treaty settlements reached in their name.

Not only can Jackson speak on their behalf and articulate their frustrations, he can also point to his own lengthy role in urban Maori development, with a range and depth of accomplishments that in some instances exceed those of iwi organisations.

The reason why this is important is that there is a widening gulf between the haves and have-nots in many iwi, with the latter feeling hard-done-by after waiting for decades in some cases for the benefits of their tribe’s Treaty settlements to trickle down to them, and still not having seen a drop.

Jackson will push the case for urban Maori to receive more government attention, and has the inside knowledge to convert whatever funding is channelled in that direction to achieve something tangible for those who need it most. His work in the area of domestic violence is a good example of such policies in action.

It would be wrong to underestimate the size of the challenge ahead of Jackson and Labour. Maori invested generations of support for Labour for what turned out to be little in the way of dividends in the past fifteen years. Meanwhile, the Maori Party has demonstrated itself to be a master of pragmatic politics, while Hone Harawira remains one of the most principled politicians in recent times, regardless of what some people may feel about those principles.

However, if anyone is capable of clawing back some of Labour’s drifting Maori vote, Jackson is that person. The question is whether he will have the backing of his colleagues, and whether there is time left for him to make that case that Maori still have a reason to return to Labour.


Dr Paul Moon is Professor of History at Auckland University of Technology

Copyright © 2017, UMA Broadcasting Ltd:

WAATEA - Website RKR18-126 Carpentry recruitment Final-177
Te Hononga
Huitahi Tuputahi
Waatea TV
John Tamihere: Where do our rates go? With the council, you never know
Everywhere you look in this country you are slapped with taxes...Everyone has to pay.When you look at the City Council where does all the money go? Why is it they always want more then want to get paid more? In the old days there was a public service ethi
Benita Tahuri from NRG Rising
A catchy, soulful tune (echoing the popular 1990's style of R&B) by Hamilton's female reggae trio NRG Rising, is to be released on March 16th, under the title 'Take Us High'.
Buddy Mikaere Ngai Te Hapu spokesman
A fundamental finding by the Environment Court that it had no power to require the wreck of the Rena to be removed off Astrolabe Reef will be challenged in an appeal to the High Court. Motiti Island's Ngai Te Hapu Incorporated and Papamoa-based Nga Potiki A Tamapahore Trust have filed the appeal, with the three-day High Court hearing expected to start on June 25.
Huhana Lyndon Piki Ake Development Limited
Kaikou Marae Te Orewai Ngai Tai Hui A Hapu 24 March 2018 11am Treaty Claims Update Our Treaty Settlement Options Te Orewai Te Horo Trust Updates Hapu Representative Reports General Business
Kate Camp Communications Manager Te Papa
A dramatic and emotionally-charged performance from Auckland artist collective Pacific Sisters welcomed Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern into the new art gallery at Te Papa known as Toi Art.
Kelvin Davis Te Tai Tokerau MP
Breakfast Host: Dale Husband
Marama Davidson Green Party MP
Breakfast Host: Dale Husband
3 Willie Te Aho | Mihini Petipeti Moni
I korero a Tumamao ki a Willie Te Aho e pa ana ki te ngangara e kai nei i nga whanau Maori, a, ko nga mihini petipeti moni.
2 Roihana Nuri | Nga take torangapu
I korero a Tumamao ki a Roihana Nuri e pa ana ki nga take torangapu mai i te hotaka Q and A i te ra nei.
Where do our rates go? With the council, you never know
John Tamihere: Everywhere you look in this country you are slapped by taxes.
What’s gone wrong in the West?
John Tamihere: On one hand, Westies have to be happy with the investment that has gone into New Lynn and Westgate.
What went wrong at Fletcher
John Tamihere: It is extraordinarily important that when a major Kiwi company with the name of Fletcher runs into financial difficulties, we all take notice.
p waateap listenp podcastp rssp facebookp twittercontactus




To receive regular updates from Waatea News.