max
°
min
°
Location:
COLOR-Waatea logo 2016-final

On Air Now
Radio Waatea

11:00am - 12:00pm
Ed Sheeran

Te Kupu Tuku Iho opens door on world of reo

Share to Email
Share to RSS
Share to Print

More Stories

A collection of conversations between two Tūhoe scholars of Māori language and culture has won Te Mūrau o te Tuhi award for a book in te reo Māori at this year's Ockham New Zealand Book Awards.

He Kupu Tuku Iho: Ko te Reo Māori te Tatau ki te Ao by Professors Te Wharehuia Milroy, who died last week, and Sir Timoti Karetu was a surprise bestseller for publisher Auckland University Press.

Judge Ruakere Hond says the book gives those who appreciate spoken reo a chance to figuratively sit down with two of the most influential exponents of reo Māori and read their conversations, their yarns and musings from decades of cultural experience.

It's a doorway to their world.

Sir Timoti will feature in conversation in te reo Māori with broadcaster and writer Scotty Morrison at the Auckland Writers Festival on Saturday evening.

The 2019 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize, the richest prize in New Zealand literature, went to Dame Fiona Kidman for This Mortal Boy, a novel recreating the events leading to the hanging of ’jukebox killer‘ Paddy Black at Mount Eden prison in 1955.

 

Copyright © 2019, UMA Broadcasting Ltd: www.waateanews.com

MUMA2

matariki x
E-Tangata-11082019
LETSLEARN-86
 
Tracey Martin finally talks the talk & why Kelvin Davis must not resign from Corrections
Martyn 'Bomber' Bradbury: Two major events occurred last week that require comment.
Ihumātao | He Raupatu Tuarua | A Second Confiscation
Dr Rawiri Taonui; This column investigates how the proposed Fletcher Residential development at Ihumātao, the National government’s Special Housing Area policy and the preoccupation of the Auckland Council, the courts and statutory bodies on preserving Māori culture as an icon of the past rather than restoring the living relationship between Māori and their whenua constitutes a second confiscation
TVNZ Journalist blames Māori, not Oranga Tamariki.
OPINION - Martyn 'Bomber' Bradbury: TVNZ Journalist Jehan Casinader, has written a remarkably shallow evaluation of the corrosive Orange Tamariki child uplift programme and has bewilderingly concluded the problem is Māori, not the policy.
0
TMP2
           

Submit

Glossary

 

Subscribe

Enter your email address to receive regular updates from Waatea News.
  • fb

On Air Now
Radio Waatea

11:00am - 12:00pm